Breaking news: Discussions in House and Senate About Salaries and Potential Budget Measures

I ran into this today, and I am not exactly sure how I should react to it. This is an article from the Atlanta Journal Constitution discussing the current proceedings and debate surrounding the potential budget cuts to the University system. Clearly tensions are running rather high.

Here is the link, though you may need to read it twice to iron it out.

http://blogs.ajc.com/gold-dome-live/2010/03/03/chancellor-college-presidents-not-overpaid/?cxntfid=blogs_gold_dome_live

What is disturbing about this is the inclusion of a report of Georgia Southern’s own budget report as “an example of waste in the university system.” I am not particularly thrilled about my university’s inclusion as an example of waste, but it is a bit heartening to hear that some of the more major cuts seem to be off the table.

This shifts the discussion in a strange new direction, targeting the salaries of more prominent members of the faculty and administration. My question is where do we go from here? What solutions can we provide to this type of waste and how can we justify the payment of teachers rivaling the bonuses of the big bankers that so infuriate main street?

That’s a tough question, and I am kind of wondering if I have bitten off more than I can chew.

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3 Responses to “Breaking news: Discussions in House and Senate About Salaries and Potential Budget Measures”

  1. One thing that the legislature may not know is that Georgia’s colleges and universities spend a lot of money marketing themselves to potential Georgia students, who are likely going to attend a Georgia college or university anyway.

    In other words, colleges with the USG system are spending money to compete against themselves. Admissions marketing is a big field. While it would be nice to draw in a lot of out-of-state students, that fact is that the HOPE scholarship keep most of our students right here.

    I agree about the over-the-top salaries, but there are some other major ways that colleges and universities could save; ending the admissions competition is one of them.

  2. atmaweapon42 Says:

    Thanks so much for that insight Mrs. B. I did not know that about the marketing issues in the state. If anything maybe this could help us create a more efficient system. But first we need to mitigate the damage potential.

  3. Remember when I told you Jack was offering some “different” solutions that were not being well received? This would be that 😉

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